Scheduled Program

AM Session

  • The Fraud Offender Profile –

    What type of person commits fraud?

    A fun exercise where students try to create the perfect fraudster.

  • Learning Objectives:

      After this block of instruction, the participants will be able to:

    • Identify common traits of a fraudster.
    • Identify common traits of a successful investigator.
  • Why People Lie – Do you wonder if there are ways to proactively address the fraudster’s rationalization process? While many internal control systems focus on limiting opportunity, there are certain things that can be done to affect motivation and rationalization. In this session, you will learn about the latest scientific research on dishonesty as well as how to incorporate these findings into your internal control system.

  • Learning Objectives:

      After this block of instruction, the participants will be able to:

    • Explain how people are able to rationalize fraudulent behavior.
    • Develop internal controls that proactively address the fraud triangle prongs of motivation and rationalization.
    • Discuss the impact of morality on dishonesty.
    • Assess the impact of organizational culture on fraud.
    • Evaluate methods to create social norms as part of an internal control structure designed to prevent fraud.

PM Session

  • You are not As Ethical as You Believe Yourself to Be! – In this completely interactive exercise, participants will learn how their mind will alter and transform facts and situations in order to achieve personal desires over organizational goals. These transformations occur automatically in the sub-conscious mind and without establishing proactive methods to mitigate these processes; organizations may inadvertently be promoting unethical behaviors by their leaders and employees.

  • Learning Objectives:

      After this block of instruction, the participants will be able to:

    • Describe the effects of bounded ethicality.
    • Assess how perspective, life experiences and culture can change ethical perceptions.
    • Discuss the psychological need to look at our actions favorably.
    • Compare/Contrast the effects of power and a leader's mindset.
    • Create mental triggers to improve ethical outcomes.
    Case Study

AM Session

  • An Investigator’s Guide to the Whistleblower – Go in-depth into the whistle-blower experience so you, as the investigator, are prepared to best interact with someone who has taken a major risk and suffered significant consequences.

  • Learning Objectives:

      After this block of instruction, the participants will be able to:

    • Explain the whistle-blower lifecycle.
    • Discuss the psychological experience of the whistle-blower.
    • Develop methods to influence and build confidence in the whistle-blower
  • An Investigator’s Guide to Corporate Psychopaths – In this exercise, learn why psychopaths and sociopaths are frequent offenders by living through the experiences of an investigator who has sat across from some of the worst psychopathic white-collar criminals.

  • Learning Objectives:

      After this block of instruction, the participants will be able to:

    • Compare/Contrast psychopaths with sociopaths.
    • Identify the three steps of the psychopath’s victim lifecycle.
    • Assess areas where the psychopath may have weaknesses in the corporate environment.

PM Session

  • Maricopa Case Study - A financial fraud case study into a fraud perpetrated by Barron's #1 ranked hedge fund manager. Students will learn how the subjects manipulated some of the best and smartest businesspersons into giving him over $100 million.

  • Learning Objectives:

      After this block of instruction, the participants will be able to:

    • Explain the rule of reciprocity’s relation to victimology.
    • Explain how the perception of scarcity allows investors to be defrauded.
    • Evaluate different methods used to influence others when committing fraud.
    • Implement red flag mechanisms to detect fraud in organizations.
  • Creating an Ethical Organizational Culture – How does someone avoid a Wells Fargo debacle and create an ethical organization from the top to the bottom? In this block of instruction, participants will debate what needs to be done to improve the ethical profile of their organization.

  • Learning Objectives:

      After this block of instruction, the participants will be able to:

    • Explain how the tone at the top affects the ethical profile of organizations.
    • Evaluate methods to prevent ethical decisions from becoming business decisions.
    • Discuss how employee performance goals can lead to unethical behavior.
    • Assess the effects of competition and rivalry on unethical behavior.
    • Develop methods to increase performance and intrinsic motivation without inadvertently leading employees to unethical behaviors.

AM Session

  • Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Behavioral Ethics: With So Much Information Accessible, What Are The Implications for Investigators? - Between social media, cookies, search histories, and algorithms, organizations have access to detailed behavioral profiles of hundreds of millions of people, albeit not always with the person’s knowledge and consent. In this interactive block of instruction, participants will discuss the ethicality and utility of leveraging such information in the investigative process.

  • Learning Objectives:

      After this block of instruction, the participants will be able to:

    • Compare and contrast different artificial intelligence methods.
    • Compare/contrast System 1 and System 2 as it relates to artificial intelligence and behavioral ethics.
    • Assess the potential ethical implications of AI for investigators.
    • Given scenarios, evaluate the ethical duties for investigators when deciding whether to utilize information collected from victims, witnesses, and suspects without their consent and knowledge.
    Case Study

PM Session

  • Comparing & Contrasting 5 Different Interview Styles - In recent years, researchers have started to study investigative interview techniques. In this block of instruction, participants will learn the strengths and weaknesses of 5 popular interviewing styles while also determining which technique best suits their personal style.

  • Learning Objectives:

      After this block of instruction, the participants will be able to:

    • Compare/Contrast The Reid Technique, the PEACE Interview method, The Cognitive Interview method, The Kinesic Interview method, and Statement Analysis.
    • Discuss the science behind each interview technique.
    • Identify strengths for each interview technique.
    • Identify weaknesses in each interview technique.
    • Evaluate each interview technique to determine which method best fits your interviewing style.
  • The Brendan Dassey Confession: Lessons for Interviewers: In the Netflix series, Making A Murderer, 16-year-old Brendan Dassey confessed to participating in a murder, but there are many opinions regarding the validity and accuracy of the confession. Using snippets and statements from the actual confession, participants will dissect the interviewer's role critiquing what went right/wrong while also discussing how to utilize these findings to perform better interviews in the future.

  • Learning Objectives:

      After this block of instruction, the participants will be able to:

    • Given a scenario, evaluate an interview for effectiveness.
    • Develop an interview style designed to best elicit information from the interviewee.
    • Compare/contrast minimization/maximization techniques.
    • Assess the strengths and weaknesses of leading questions.
    • Explain the importance of listening in interviews.
    • Develop methods to limit the interviewer’s percentage of talking during an interview.
    • Explain the importance of periodically re-charging System 2 in the interview process.
    • Implement the moral equilibrium concept to promote truthfulness.
    • Devise methods to avoid false confessions.